Tag Archives: business

Great Gatorade Subway Poster Remix

Although Poster Boy has been getting most of the credit for the very creative remixing of the NYC subway ads that plague us riders, it has been going on for years.

Recently, I saw this incredibly simple but totally brilliant little remix of a Gatorade ad:

g-ad

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Dear Honeyshed – Hate to Say I Told You So, But…

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Well, it’s official – Honeyshed, the QVC for Generation Why, is officially no more.  According to AdWeek the site is shuttering due to a lack of new funding from Publicis.

I was skepticle but willing to wait and see back in March but by November I was feeling even less positive about what was a pretty bad idea given poor execution.

From AdWeek:

At its relaunch in November, Honeyshed projected the site to reach 550,000 visitors a month after launch, 1 million by February and 2 million at the end of 2009.  All told, Honeyshed promised advertisers it would generate 9 million content views in that time.

According to comScore, Honeyshed drew 117,000 visitors in December before trailing off the next month. Griefer said the site drew about 15,000 unique visitors per day after the relaunch, supported by a heavy marketing campaign, but saw those numbers dwindle when it cut back on advertising.

I honestly don’t know who thought this was ever going to be a good idea but it became painfully clear it was doomed to fail when they decided to try and sell a bunch of over-priced and relatively unwanted products to a fickle and savvy audience.

So, farewell Honeyshed.  Few knew you were evert here and maybe that’s for the best.

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Technology for Government Ok, Not for Citizens

Logo of the anti-RFID campaign by German priva...
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There has always been an uneasy relationship between technology, government and citizens.

With each technological advance there is always a strong government push to regulate and control but the advent of the internet has created a world where it seems almost comical to watch various attempts to clamp down on, say, pirates.

However, governments can and do severly limit citizen access to technology and information, usually for reasons that actually make little or no sense.

Take, for example, a recent Indian court case that hopes to limit access to GoogleEarth because it is believed that the Mumbai terrorists used the service to chart their attacks. (via)

As awful as those attacks were I fail to believe that they simply would have given up if they didn’t have access to GoogleEarth.  This kind of response not only demonstrates a general lack of understanding of the technology but it means that the Indian government would rather remove a fantastic public resource from its own population that give potential terrorists access to the same information that can be gleaned from a good roadmap.

On the flip-side of the coin is governments thinking that they can control technology and use it to track and control its own citizens.  One very scary example of this is the continued push to make us all carry RFID-enabled passports with a chip containing all of our personal information.  The problem is that these chips are completely insecure, as clearly demonstrated by Chris Paget:

Using a $250 Motorola RFID reader and antenna connected to his laptop, Chris recently drove around San Francisco reading RFID tags from passports, driver licenses, and other identity documents. In just 20 minutes, he found and cloned the passports of two very unaware US citizens. (via)

So, the government is willing to trade your personal privacy for their own convenience.  Nice work, guys.

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Are All-You-Can-Eat Music Subscriptions the Future of Music Sales?

There is a compelling post by CNet’s Matt Asay exploring the various potential of future music business models.

So I think the “adoption tax” model is promising. The future is flat-rate: you subscribe, you forget about paying for individual transactions, you enjoy more music than you ever have before.

While I certainly see the appeal of this sort of approach I just canceled my cable TV service because the all-you-can-eat approach wasn’t worth the cost – and, of course, because of all of the alternative means to get that content.

Right now, the same is true for music.  There are so many free ways (both legal and piratey) to acquire music right now that the idea of adding a new monthly music bill to my accounting seems like a stretch.

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ManiaTV Takes a Shot at Being a Music Label

PaidContent has a bit of information about ManiaTV‘s latest venture, an attempt to reinvent what it means to be a music label:

it’s jumping into the music business with a new show called Making the Music, which effectively seeks to take over the role long played by the music labels. The original series is focused on hip-hop producer Scoop Deville as he works on a new album—and maniaTV will get a cut of the revenues once the LP is released.

The idea is that Scoop et. al. will be able to use the social media aspects of show as a way to test-market and hone their final product.  Of course, this only works if people tune in and get involved.

I am always interested in new takes on music production and promotion and this is certainly an intriguing idea.  One does have to wonder, with LP sales decreasing pretty steadily, if getting a cut of the record sales is really worth all that much.  Maybe they are cut into the other potential revenue streams such as licensing, touring and merchandising?

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Free Advice for Whole Foods

Whole Foods in the Time Warner Bldg
Image by Susan NYC via Flickr

I was at Whole Foods today, the incredibly crowded one in the Time Warner Center, and noticed that there were ads running on the screen next to the display of the items I purchased.

For just a moment, it looked like the ads were actually related to what I was buying.  I quickly noticed this was not the case but that there were just five or six ads in rotation.

Strikes me as a huge missed opportunity.  There they are scanning every item I am buying so how hard would it be to have that information cross-referenced with the available ads and run ads that actually related to what I was buying.

Sure, I am done shopping for today but what a perfect time to plant an idea in my head for next time.

So, Whole Foods, link that scanner to the ad-delivery program and you might increase those sales in these tough times for no additional cost.

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DRM Bites Publisher and Readers in the Ass

I love this story via BoingBoing‘s resident awesome guy Cory Doctrow about a publisher who locked up their ebooks with DRM, limiting how their customers could interact with the book they thought they had bought.

Unfortunately, the company that handeld the DRM has gone out of business and taken the license keys with them.  This has led to the following F*ck-You from the publisher to their customers:

However, as noted above, other formats are delivered through third party aggregators. We do not have legal control of those third party servers. If those third party servers “go dark” for one reason or another, we have no way to continue delivering those files.

Yup, once again proving why any company who uses DRM cares less about their customers than they do about over-protecting their market-share.

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